Tamsulosin Oral : Uses, Side Effects

Tamsulosin Oral: Uses, Side Effects

Tamsulosin: Tamsulosin (Flomax) is an alpha-blocker that relaxes the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate. Tamsulosin is used to improve urination in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate). Tamsulosin is not FDA approved for use in women or children.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to tamsulosin. Do not take tamsulosin with other similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), or terazosin (Hytrin).

Tamsulosin Uses

Tamsulosin Side Effects

Tamsulosin is used in men to treat the symptoms of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH) which include difficulty urinating (hesitation, dribbling, weak stream, and incomplete bladder emptying), painful urination, and urinary frequency and urgency. Tamsulosin is in a class of medications called alpha-blockers. It works by relaxing the muscles in the prostate and bladder so that urine can flow easily.

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to tamsulosin, sulfa medications, or any other medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: other alpha-blocker medications such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), and terazosin (Hytrin); anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin); cimetidine (Tagamet); and medications for erectile dysfunction (ED) such as sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), or vardenafil (Levitra); Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you more carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had prostate cancer or liver or kidney disease.
  • you should know that tamsulosin is only for use in men. Women should not take tamsulosin, especially if they are pregnant or could become pregnant or are breast-feeding. If a pregnant woman takes tamsulosin, she should call her doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking tamsulosin. If you need to have eye surgery at any time during or after your treatment, be sure to tell your doctor that you are taking or have taken tamsulosin.
  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive a car, operate machinery, or perform dangerous tasks until you know how this medication affects you.
  • you should know that tamsulosin may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, a spinning sensation, and fainting, especially when you get up too quickly from a lying position. This is more common when you first start taking tamsulosin or after your dose is increased. To help avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up. Call your doctor if these symptoms are severe or do not go away.

Tamsulosin HCl

Tamsulosin HCl

Tamsulosin is used by men to treat the symptoms of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia-BPH). It does not shrink the prostate, but it works by relaxing the muscles in the prostate and the bladder. This helps to relieve symptoms of BPH such as difficulty in beginning the flow of urine, weak stream, and the need to urinate often or urgently (including during the middle of the night).

Tamsulosin belongs to a class of drugs known as alpha-blockers.

Do not use this medication to treat high blood pressure.

Tamsulosin is available under the following different brand names: Flomax.

Dosage of Tamsulosin:

Dosage Forms and Strengths

Capsule

  • 0.4mg

Dosing Considerations – Should be Given as Follows:

Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

  • 0.4 mg orally once daily, 30 minutes after the same meal each day; if the response is inadequate after 2-4 weeks, may be increased to 0.8 mg once daily; if therapy is interrupted, should be resumed at 0.4 mg once daily

Bladder Outlet Obstruction

Relief of symptoms

  • 0.4 mg orally once daily

Ureteral Stones

Facilitation of stone expulsion

  • 0.4 mg orally once daily; discontinued after successful expulsion (average, 1-2 weeks)

Dosing Modifications

Renal impairment

  • CrCl 10 mL/min or greater: Dosage adjustment not necessary
  • CrCl less than 10 mL/min: Not studied

Hepatic impairment

  • Mild to moderate: Dosage adjustment not necessary
  • Severe: Not studied

Tamsulosin Uses

Tamsulosin comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day. Take tamsulosin 30 minutes after the same meal each day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take tamsulosin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the tamsulosin capsules whole; do not split, chew, crush, or open them.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of tamsulosin and may increase your dose after 2 to 4 weeks.

Tamsulosin may help control your condition, but it will not cure it. Continue to take tamsulosin even if you feel well. Do not stop taking tamsulosin without talking to your doctor.

Tamsulosin 0.4 Mg

Tamsulosin is a selective alpha-1A and alpha-1B adrenoceptor antagonist that exerts its greatest effect in the prostate and bladder, where these receptors are most common. It is indicated for the treatment of signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy. Antagonism of these receptors leads to the relaxation of smooth muscle in the prostate and detrusor muscles in the bladder, allowing for better urinary flow. Other alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonists developed in the 1980s were less selective and more likely to act on the smooth muscle of blood vessels, resulting in hypotension.

Tamsulosin is an alpha-adrenoceptor blocker with specificity for the alpha-1A and alpha-1D subtypes, which are more common in the prostate and submaxillary tissue. The final subtype, alpha-1B, are most common in the aorta and spleen. Tamsulosin binds to alpha-1A receptors 3.9-38 times more selectively than alpha-1B and 3-20 times more selectively than alpha-1D. This selectivity allows for a significant effect on urinary flow with a reduced incidence of adverse reactions like orthostatic hypotension.

Tamsulosin is a blocker of alpha-1A and alpha-1D adrenoceptors. About 70% of the alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the prostate are of the alpha-1A subtype. By blocking these adrenoceptors, smooth muscle in the prostate is relaxed and urinary flow is improved. The blocking of alpha-1D adrenoceptors relaxes the detrusor muscles of the bladder which prevents storage symptoms. The specificity of tamsulosin focuses on the effects on the target area while minimizing effects in other areas.

Side Effects Of Tamsulosin

Tamsulosin may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it or when you start taking it again. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Avoid standing for long periods of time or becoming overheated during exercise and in hot weather. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

If you stop taking this medicine for any reason, call your doctor before you start taking it again. You may need a dose adjustment.

Tamsulosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medication. Do not stop using tamsulosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

There are many other drugs that can interact with this medicine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use.

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all the medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use tamsulosin if you are allergic to it. Do not take tamsulosin together with similar medicines such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), silodosin (Rapaflo), or terazosin (Hytrin).

To make sure tamsulosin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a history of prostate cancer;
  • low blood pressure; or
  • an allergy to sulfa drugs.

Tamsulosin can affect your pupils during cataract surgery. Tell your eye surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medicine. Do not stop using tamsulosin before surgery unless your surgeon tells you to.

Although this medicine is not for use in women, tamsulosin is not expected to harm an unborn baby. If you are a woman using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

This medicine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take tamsulosin?

Take tamsulosin exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Tamsulosin is usually taken once a day, approximately 30 minutes after a meal. Try to take this medication at the same time each day.

Do not crush, chew, or open a capsule. Swallow the capsule whole.

Tamsulosin lowers blood pressure and may cause dizziness or fainting, especially when you first start taking it, or when you start taking it again. Call your doctor if you have severe dizziness or feel like you might pass out.

Some things can cause your blood pressure to get too low. This includes vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low-salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. You will also need to be checked for prostate cancer before and during treatment with tamsulosin.

You may feel very dizzy when you first wake up. Be careful when standing or sitting up from a lying position.

What is the drug Tamsulosin used for?

Tamsulosin (Flomax) is an alpha-blocker that relaxes the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate. Tamsulosin is used to improve urination in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate). Tamsulosin is not FDA approved for use in women or children.

How long should I take tamsulosin?

Use the medicine exactly as directed. Tamsulosin is usually taken once a day, approximately 30 minutes after the same meal each day. Swallow the capsule whole and do not crush, chew, break, or open it. Your blood pressure will need to be checked often.

What are the long term effects of taking tamsulosin?

The more common side effects that can occur with tamsulosin include:
  • headache.
  • dizziness.
  • runny nose.
  • diarrhea.
  • cough.
  • decreased semen.
  • loss of energy or muscle strength.
  • sore throat or trouble swallowing.